saxophone basics
saxophone warmup
saxophone tone
saxophone articulation
saxophone vibrato
saxophone technique
saxophone tuning
saxophone education
saxophone teaching
saxophone lesson/masterclass
beginner saxophone
counting, sightreading
saxophone performing
Joe Murphy, saxophone
saxophone techniques
saxophone altissimo
circular breathing
saxophone multiphonics
saxophone quartertones
saxophone slap tongue
improvising, transposing
saxophone resources
saxophone research
saxophone repair/reeds
saxophone literature, recording
jazz saxophone
saxophone history
saxophone humor
 

to be expanded...

Jazz

practically every aspect is different from classical playing (sound, equipment, articulation, patterns,

 

Sound: can be explained in different ways:

warm air, larger air column (jazz) vs. cold air, focused pinpoint air stream (classical)

more overtones in jazz sound, subtone-like, no vibrato

each note has its individual quality to exploit, classical (string-like) playing strives for evenness

flat end of pitch that the sax allows (push in) blow down, play with tuner

 

Equipment:  softer reeds than classical (LaVoz, Rico), many kinds of mouthpieces

 

Articulation: no ta-ta articulation, often begins with breath attack

 

Scales:  pentatonic, blues, arpeggios to 13th, modes, patterns/licks, usually use bis Bb, almost always front E, F

 

There are many ways to approach learning jazz. Learn the theory, learn the tunes, listen/imitate, improvise (all must be done, in any order)

  1) Develop the ear; play simple, question/answer melodies; Listen rhythmically, improvise melodically with a drum; sing then play, transcribe solos

  2) Imitate: play (memorize) transcribed solos, imitate every nuance, inflection

  3) know the theory: practice sheet method for progressions (roots, roots/3rds, 3rds/7ths, 1357, 3579...), transpose licks/patterns (especially for ii V I) to all keys, play with Band in Box or Aebersold, memorize chord changes (visualize keyboard or staff, or hear root/bass in your ear), literally move feet to simulate organ pedals. Common progressions: blues: I   IV  I    I    IV  IV  I    I    V7  V7  I    V

  4) Memorize many tunes (and learn the words), bring out characteristic qualities of the tune, in your solo (specific notes, intervals, contour, rhythm)

 

resources: fake book, Abersold, etudes Turpen diss,

Doubling - articles

to be expanded...

 

    

saxophone basics
saxophone warmup
saxophone tone
saxophone articulation
saxophone vibrato
saxophone technique
saxophone tuning
saxophone education
saxophone teaching
saxophone lesson/masterclass
beginner saxophone
counting, sightreading
saxophone performing
Joe Murphy, saxophone
saxophone techniques
saxophone altissimo
circular breathing
saxophone multiphonics
saxophone quartertones
saxophone slap tongue
improvising, transposing
saxophone resources
saxophone research
saxophone repair/reeds
saxophone literature
jazz saxophone
saxophone history
saxophone humor