saxophone basics
saxophone warmup
saxophone tone
saxophone articulation
saxophone vibrato
saxophone technique
saxophone tuning
saxophone education
saxophone teaching
saxophone lesson/masterclass
beginner saxophone
counting, sightreading
saxophone performing
Joe Murphy, saxophone
saxophone techniques
saxophone altissimo
circular breathing
saxophone multiphonics
saxophone quartertones
saxophone slap tongue
improvising, transposing
saxophone resources
saxophone research
saxophone repair/reeds
saxophone literature, recording
jazz saxophone
saxophone history
saxophone humor

 

 Saxophone articulation

Correct articulation on wind instruments is more a result of a consistent air stream than it is of a strong tongue muscle.  When one articulates on a saxophone in the classical style, only the tongue moves, not the throat, jaw or embouchure. Make sure to keep air forward and fast.  Following is a series of different articulations used by Jean-Marie Londeix.
 

 

Counting
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According to Jan LaRue rhythm is the "structure of musical movement, the control of time-elapse.  Though the most fundamental of musical elements, rhythm is the most mysterious, elusive to define because our sense of movement comes from so many different sources."  Basic knowledge of rhythm is essential for any musical performance.  Discussions of rhythm and rhythmic analysis can be endless and complex.  Here I will just give the basics and implore students to use and teach rhythm syllables. 


 

For students who have rhythmic problems, simply drawing vertical lines on a chalkboard, one for each beat, helps more than a metronome.  At first the teacher will need to be a visual metronome, marking over each of the beats repeatedly.  This spatial orientation is easier for some students than trying to keep a beat (taught as physical movement) while staying still.  Another suggestion is to lightly touch the student in time with the beat.  The tactile sensation helps.

Following is a counting exercise (better exercises to come). The arches are slurs, not ties. Students, be able to count & say articulation. More counting



Sightreading

 

-          Do not sightread music which you intend to prepare. Music to be prepared should be internalized first so there is no arbitrary notes, articulations, tone, etc.

-          In my method, sightreading is “preparation in fast motion”.  This has 2 implications: 1. focus on a preparation parameter, 2. choosing the most appropriate parameter/level for optimal gain.  Focus on:

Counting, as beginning step

Articulation (counting embedded)

Grouping/phrasing (counting/artic assumed), technical spots

                Repeated rhythm

                Prominent interval

                Contour (scale, skip)

                Phrase from long note to long note

-          Good sightreading music:

Marches (any part, eg oboe)

Band Literature, see Lit.

Lacour 100 Dechiffrages

Lacour 28 modes de Messiaen

Paquot 12 Melodic Etudes

Berkowitz New Approach to Sight Singing, or any sightsinging book

Karg-Elert Sonata

Some people prefer duets for sightreading (Voxman)

    

saxophone basics
saxophone warmup
saxophone tone
saxophone articulation
saxophone vibrato
saxophone technique
saxophone tuning
saxophone education
saxophone teaching
saxophone lesson/masterclass
beginner saxophone
counting, sightreading
saxophone performing
Joe Murphy, saxophone
saxophone techniques
saxophone altissimo
circular breathing
saxophone multiphonics
saxophone quartertones
saxophone slap tongue
improvising, transposing
saxophone resources
saxophone research
saxophone repair/reeds
saxophone literature
jazz saxophone
saxophone history
saxophone humor