saxophone basics
saxophone warmup
saxophone tone
saxophone articulation
saxophone vibrato
saxophone technique
saxophone tuning
saxophone education
saxophone teaching
saxophone lesson/masterclass
beginner saxophone
counting, sightreading
saxophone performing
Joe Murphy, saxophone
saxophone techniques
saxophone altissimo
circular breathing
saxophone multiphonics
saxophone quartertones
saxophone slap tongue
improvising, transposing
saxophone resources
saxophone research
saxophone repair/reeds
saxophone literature, recording
jazz saxophone
saxophone history
saxophone humor

Saxophone Performance, Teaching

  (yearly cycles, life¡¯s work)

Being a performer helps teaching, being a teacher helps performing

     

Saxophone Performing

  Too many people praise the precision with which organized musical sound is produced rather than the energy with which it is manipulated.

  One trait common to all great interpreters is their capacity for intensification. 

 

-          As performance day approaches don¡¯t do run-throughs exclusively, still practice in specific ways.

-          Be aware of how much practice is good for you on performance day (I currently prefer very little)

-          dialogue with the composer, audience, fellow performers is more important than perfection

-          during performance focus on one parameter sometimes helps (air, character, tuning in fast motion, play to one person in the audience)

-          the audience is on your side, feel their support

-          smile, it releases endorphins

-          on performance day I prefer to exercise, it helps calm nerves

-          within 30-60 minutes before performance I like to sing through the music, it focuses the ear, air, brain

 Performance day

1.  Put ears in the back of the hall (you be audience), imagine filling the hall sideways with sound.

2.  Play fast to the ear (not the fingers), remember much of the audience is hearing the piece for the first time.  Fill up time qualitatively

3.  The audience is on your side, feel the support of other living beings.  Play to one person in the audience (makes the task seem more achievable).

4.  Present the piece as a finished work of art (like sculpture), defend the composer.

5.  Alter your audience's consciousness, expect this to require different emotional heights for each performance/audience.

6.  Imagine the saxophone as animate.

7.  Energy in/energy out, air splits at the reed into horn/into body.  Good reeds and a well adjusted saxophone are imperative for this.

8.  Posture of a singer, pretend there's no saxophone.

9.  During the performance I often think:

  B  buzz, absence of                                pitch is in the air
 
A  air, fast                                          tone is in the fingers
 
S  sing, pretend                                     technique is in the left hand
 
F  fingers, relaxed as if slow motion
 

 

Organizing the Performance

 

Programming; many factors including

                Timing: 5-10 minute first piece; 20-40 minute first half; 20-30 minute second half

                Variety: choose 2: unaccompanied, with piano, small ensemble

                                Choose 3: standard, contemporary, easy/beautiful, encore-like, jazz, original, diff saxes

                Theme? See Literature

 

Scheduling the performance

                Check with personnel (need to know program first), teacher, family, calendar

                Obtaining off campus performance

                                Musical America, College Music Society Directory of Music Schools

                                Initial contact 12-18 months prior

                                Contact should include proposed program, bio, any promotional materials, recording,

some personal connection

 

Programs

                Submit electronically to avoid mis-typing

                Program notes

                Guess correct number, (usually 75 for students), keep some for files

 

Personnel

                Stage crew, written instructions on stage setup/changes

                Ushers, at all entrances

                Recording Tech (bring your own tape/CD)

                Page turner

                Let all know the concert attire

 

Dress Rehearsal

                Record?

                In order?

                How far in advance?

 

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                Posters

                Postcards

                Restaurant Cards

                Email family/friends/teachers/students

               

Reception

                Reserve room

                Arrange food

                Print in program or announce

 

Followup

                Pay personnel at the recital (& have thank you note)

                Any followup thankyous.

File the recording (check for any pieces worthy of sending for future gigs)

 

Musician¡¯s Health

Book: The Musician¡¯s Survival Manual by Richard Norris, 1993; includes:

Overuse injuries, recognition, prevention, treatment.

Specific focus on neck, back, shoulder, elbow, fingers, stage fright

Bibliography includes Performing Arts Clinics, Organizations, & Publications.

 

There are many self-awareness techniques, methods, programs that helps anyone (especially performers). They include:

Alexander Technique (natural body mechanics/posture)

Chi

Feldenkrais (natural healing)

Hara (breathing/meditation, the abdomen and the attributes of power, stamina)

JinShin Jyutsu (holistic healing)

Rolfing (alternative medicine)

Starfire (Native American)

Tai Chi Tao

Tao

Yoga

Zen

    

saxophone basics
saxophone warmup
saxophone tone
saxophone articulation
saxophone vibrato
saxophone technique
saxophone tuning
saxophone education
saxophone teaching
saxophone lesson/masterclass
beginner saxophone
counting, sightreading
saxophone performing
Joe Murphy, saxophone
saxophone techniques
saxophone altissimo
circular breathing
saxophone multiphonics
saxophone quartertones
saxophone slap tongue
improvising, transposing
saxophone resources
saxophone research
saxophone repair/reeds
saxophone literature
jazz saxophone
saxophone history
saxophone humor